Adril Gates - War of 1812 Soldier and POW


By Susan LeBlanc, AG


Last spring when I went to Sweet Home, Oregon to present lectures at the Sweet Home Genealogical Society, I briefly mentioned the Chapin family in one of my lectures. A local researcher approached me to mention a research file of the Chapin family created from information gathered by one of their members, and scanned by their society on June 8, 2010.

A few days after returning home I received an envelope containing the CD. It was left to linger on my desk as I worked on other projects, as my work on the Chapin family is of limited interest. When I finally opened the CD, I was utterly amazed at what it contained. Through the combined efforts of Howard Roy Gates, his wife, Veatrice Adeline Chapin, and his sister Blanche Gates Robinson Cox, the file contained a wonderful family history collection for their ancestors. Fortunately my husband descends from this same Gates family and we now have a wealth of information to include in our family history.

The collection included: thirteen family group sheets and six pedigree charts; Red Butte Cemetery, Great Falls, Montana information; nine documents; a two-page family history; and eleven pages of pictures. These have all been beautifully preserved in a manner that is easily shared by future generations of researchers. This was truly a serendipity moment for me.

Until April 2011, Ardil Gates was an unknown ancestor in my husband’s ancestral line. In the process of gathering family information, the ancestral line had been connected to his brother, Ira Gates, who had a grandson, Albert, born three years before the son of Ardil named Albert in 1836. Albert Gates, the son of Ardil, was the father of eleven children. They include Roena Gates, his oldest daughter born in 1865, the great grandmother of my husband, and Byron Gates, born in 1887, the father of Howard Roy Gates. Due to this fantastic gift, from a generous fellow genealogist, we are now in possession of previously unknown pictures and documents for my husband’s ancestors. After reviewing other documents it is apparent that this information is correct.

The wonderful discovery led us to the indexed databases on familysearch.org and we found indexes of a Will and a War of 1812 Pension file for Ardil Gates. The Meeker County, Minnesota Deputy Court Administrator emailed a copy of the Will dated April 13, 1880, in which Ardil Gates leaves most of his estate to his wife Rachel Gates and his son Albert J. Gates.1   No other children are mentioned. It provides the connection we needed for my husband’s second great grandfather to his third great grandfather. Then we received the War of 1812 Pension file, three days after ordering it from Jonathan Webb Deiss, a private records accessor for files from the National Archives. This file contains sixty-three pages.2

Ardil or Ardel Gates; the name being spelled both ways in various documents though in his personal writing it is usually Ardil. He was born August 11, 1792 in Hinesburg, Chittenden County, Vermont, according to family information. He was the youngest of nine children born to David Gates and Jerusha Whitney. At the outbreak of the War of 1812 he enlisted in the New York Militia. He was almost twenty years old. His brothers, Dr. Richard Whitney Gates and David Gates II also served.

Ardil served under Captain Rufus Tilden in the New York Militia, as a Private, from July 6, 1812 to December 13, 1812, for a total of 184 days.3 This was just four days more than the required 180 days to qualify for a military pension. He also is listed as having served in Sumner’s Regiment, Vermont Militia as a Private.4 From his War of 1812 Pension Index card we learn that he received Bounty Land #6742 of eighty acres in 1850 and #8745 of eighty acres in 1855. His Pension Application is #24393 and Certificate is #15817. After his death his widow, Rachel Gates, received a pension and her records are for a Widow’s Application #40466 and Certificate #31132. His card includes their date of marriage, December 21, 1857 in Eaton Rapids, Eaton County, Michigan.

Ardil died on July 14, 1880 in Meeker County, Minnesota. Rachel died on April 7, 1890 in Forest Prairie, Minnesota. It notes Rachel’s previous marriages to Edwards and Nichols and provides her maiden name of Longstreet. Their places of residence for 1850 and 1855 as Beaver Dam, Dodge County, Wisconsin; 1871 Blue Earth County, Minnesota, Post Office Speir; 1880-1887 Meeker County, Minnesota, Post Office Forest Prairie.5

David served under Erwin Covil and Heacock’s Companies in the New York Militia from September 11, 1812 to September 26, 1812, November 29, 1812 to December 8, 1812, and September 11, 1814 to September 23, 1814. There are some additional regiments listed for David Gates in the Military Service Records at ancestry.com. From his War of 1812 Pension Index card we learn that he had a suspended Bounty Land claim #51796 for 1850, a Bounty Land claim #40828 for 160 acres in 1855 and a rejected Bounty Land claim #339246 for 1855. After his death his widow, Polly Hall Gates, did receive a pension and her records are for a Widows Application #25097 and Certificate #16326. His card includes their date of marriage, January 11, 1816 in Bristol, Addison County, Vermont.

David died on November 19, 1863 in Ellington, Chautauqua County, New York. Polly died about 1880. An interesting note on the card is, “Papers of Soldier’s Additional Service not on file in the brief.” 6 This lack of documentation may have lead to the suspended and rejected claims for bounty land. They may have been located at the time of the widow’s application, as it was approved.

Dr. Richard Whitney Gates was not listed in the pension index file, having passed away soon after the bounty lands became available and long before pensions were enacted. His service record indicates that he served in Benedict’s Regiment, in Robert’s Battalion, New York Militia, as a Private.7

Additional information was found for all three brothers at the US Gen website listing of War of 1812 Veterans Living in Franklin County, New York at the time of service. Some of the information is slightly different, so it is important to review and compare.8

To clarify the military activities that occurred at the time of service for the Gates brothers I checked out The Official War of 1812 Bicentennial Website for a timeline. Some dates of significance to their service include:

June 18, US Declaration of War against Great Britain

October 23, Battle of St Regis, Lower Canada (Quebec, CAN)

November 20, First Battle of Lacolle Mill, Lower Canada (Quebec, CAN)

November 23, Raid of St Regis, Lower Canada (Quebec, CAN)

November 23, Raid of French Mills (New York).9

At the website for the New York State Archives there was information about ordering military service records. They require that a War Service Records Search Request Form be used to order War of 1812 payroll cards and veterans' claims documents. (Post-1859) [$3.00 each] These may provide some additional information on the brothers.10 A request for the records for Ardil, David and Richard Gates was sent on December 24, 2011.

An important record to pursue is the New York Military Equipment Claims, War of 1812

No. 12,673 for Ardil Gates, residence Laboeuff, Erie County, Pennsylvania, amount allowed $73, which was indexed at ancestry.com.11

The pension file of Ardil Gates provides a wealth of information not found in the previous records located in online research. In deciding whether to order the file or wait until it is digitized was based on how quickly the experts felt the records will be made available. They indicated it might be a while before all of the records are available. For the file on David Gates, I will probably wait. Currently the Federation of Genealogical Societies is sponsoring a fund raising effort to support the digitization project.

To conclude this article let’s look at some of the more valuable information from the pension file for Ardil and Rachel Gates from a genealogical viewpoint. These are notes from the original documents.

Bounty Land Warrant Application of Ardil Gates, dated November 18, 1850


Age 58, of Beaver Dam, Dodge County, Wisconsin (Puts birth at about 1792)

Served in Company of Captain Rufus Tilden, he volunteered at Malone, Franklin County, New York, about July 8, 1812, for six months and actually served six months and four days. He declares that in consequence of being in captivity with the enemy at the close of his term, he was deprived of an honorable discharge.

Ardil Gates (Appears to be original signature.)

Commissioner of Pensions, Department of the Interior, June 4, 1851


It appears from documents on file in this Office, that Ardil Gates, a Private of Captain Rufus Tilden’s Company of New York Militia, entered the service on July 8, 1812 for 6 mo., and served till December 13, 1812, the date of his discharge. The rolls state nothing in regard to his being taken Prisoner.12 (His time of being a prisoner was not documented, but there are records of his company being taken prisoners and later being set free in a prisoner exchange.)

Bounty Land Warrant Application of Ardil Gates, dated March 10, 1855


Ardil Gates aged sixty-two years, resident of Beaver Dam, Dodge County, Wisconsin.

He was taken prisoner at French Mills, about November 4, 1812. Was discharged about January 8, 1813 and returned home, leaving the service at that time by permission but never received any written certificate of discharge.

Two witnesses J. F. Farmany and David Ransom

Adril Gates (Unique signature, probably his original.)

Brief form with information concerning Bounty Land Warrant Application dated April 13, 1855. 66323 Act Mar 3/55, Ardil Gates, Priv., Capt Tilden, Col. Yancy, N. Y. Mil July 8, 1812 (Col. Yancy would be the commander of his Regiment, which previously was not included in his applications; this is the only place this is recorded.)

Pension Application State of Minnesota, County of Blue Earth, September 26, 1871


Ardil Gates aged seventy-nine years, resident of Danville, Blue Earth County, Minnesota.

Declares that he is married, that his wife’s name was Amelia Hall, (Amelia’s name is crossed out and above it is the name of Rachel his second wife), Rachel Edward to whom he was married at Eaton Rapids, Eaton County, Michigan, on or about the 20th day of December 1857. (His first wife, Amelia Hall, died in 1854 in Ellington, New York.)

That he is the identical Ardil Gates who enlisted in Captain Rufus Tildin Company at Malone, Franklin County, New York, on the field June 20, 1812. Called into active service on July 8, 1812, and honorably discharged in January 1813. Was taken prisoner at French Mills in Franklin County New York, now called Ft. Convington he believes, about November 4, 1812. Carried to Montreal, Canada, and kept in prison until some time in January 1813. Was at the taking of the British General at St. Regis near the corner of St. Lawrence County, New York about October 1, 1812. He thinks his Major’s name was Guilford D. Young. That at no time during the late rebellion against the Authority of the United States, adhered to the cause of the Enemies of the Government. Giving them aid as comfort or exercised the function of any office whatever under any authority as pretended authority – no hostility to the United States; and that he will support the Constitution of the United States.

Witnesses were: James A. Kennedy and John W. Trask

War of 1812, Act February 14, 1871, Brief of Claim For A Survivor’s Pension


Oath to support the Constitution of the United States subscribed. Ardel Gates admitted April 15, 1872, to a pension of eight dollars per month, from February 14, 1871.

Claim of Widow for Service Pension Under the provisions of Sections 4736 to 4740 Revised Statutes, the Act of March 9th, 1878, State of Minnesota, County of Meeker, Probate Court, on October 11, 1880

Rachel Gates aged 80 years, a resident of Meeker County in the State of Minnesota.

That her husband Ardel Gates died at Meeker County, Minnesota, on July 14, 1880, and that she has not again married; and she further declares that the following have been the places of residence of herself and her husband since their said marriage in: Union Erie County, Pennsylvania; thence in Montcalm County, Michigan; and thence Blue Earth County, Minnesota; thence Meeker County, Minnesota.

Rachel X Gates (Her mark.)

Witnesses were: William R. Edwards aged 55 years (Her son.) and William R. Cole aged 27 years.

Testimony of Deponents State of Minnesota, County of Meeker dated October 11, 1880

William P. Edward age fifty-five years, and Rachel N. Edwards age fifty-three (Son and daughter in law of Rachel Gates the widow) say that they were present at the marriage of Ardel Gates and Rachel Nichols; that the said Ardel Gates and Rachel Nichols were married at the house of deponents in Eaton Rapids, Eaton County, Michigan in the year 1857. That they were married by a Justice of the peace by the name of J. Philips. That they lived together ever since Ardel Gates died in the town of Forest Prairie, Meeker County, Minnesota on July 14, 1880 at the residence of said deceased in said town & County. That they know personally that at the time of said Ardel Gate’s death that he was in receipt of a pension from the Government as a soldier of the War of 1812 and that his pension certificate was No. 15817.

State of Minnesota, County of Meeker, in the matter of the Widows Service Pension Claim acct. of Ardel Gates, dated January 17, 1881

That her maiden name was Rachel Longstreet, that she was married to George Edwards but is unable to give date of said marriage. That her said husband, George Edwards, died in May 1836. That she was married to Isaac Nichols in 1841. That her said husband Isaac Nichols died March 1845. That on December 21, 1857 she was married to Ardel Gates at Eaton Rapids Michigan. (This information was required due to the use of incorrect information in previous applications.)

Rachel X Gates, Her mark

Witnesses: Mary M. Taylor and Wm. R. Edwards (Her son.)

State of Minnesota, County of Meeker, in the matter of the Widows Service Pension Claim acct. of Ardel Gates, dated January 17, 1881

William R. Edwards says that he is well acquainted with Rachel Gates, widow of Ardel Gates, and has been for upwards of fifty years. And that the said Ardel Gates died on July 14, 1880. (He restates the information in the previous file as testimony supporting the information with regards to his mother’s marriages.)

“My knowledge of the above facts is personal acquaintance with said George Edwards, Isaac Nichols and Ardel Gates. And the personal knowledge of the fact of their death.” That he was present at the funeral of each of said deceased persons and knows of his and personal knowledge as to the marriage of said parties.

Service Pension War of 1812, Widow’s Brief, Milwaukee, Claim No. 40466, Act of March 9, 1878, Cert. No. 31132, approved January 25, 1881 

Application filed Oct 19, 1880, admitted January 20, 1881, to a pension of Eight Dollars per month from July 15, 1880 the date of Soldiers death 14 July 1880.

Special Examination Division, Department of the Interior, Pension Office, Litchfield, Minn. Apr. 19, 1887

Rachel Gates. A widow pension of War of 1812, as per certificate #31132, payable at the

Milwaukee Agency, is alive and resides at Forest City, Meeker Co, Minn. with Mr. Edwards, her son-in-law. She has lived there about twelve years, and her identity is vouched for by the local town clerk, justice of the peace and neighbor Eli Boring.

31132 Gates, Rachel, Milwaukee, Roll No. 8156, War of 1812, Act March 9, 1878


Rachel Gates $86.00 June 1890, thirty-six dollars being for 3 months pension due me, from the 4th day of March 1890 to the 4th day of June 1890.

3-405 Pensioner Dropped, U.S. Pension Agency, Milwaukee, August 29, 1890

I hereby report that the name of Rachel Gates, Widow, War 1812, who was a pensioner on the rolls of this Agency, with Certificate No. 31132 and who was last paid at $12 to March 4, 1890 has been dropped because of death of pensioner.

Voucher for Accrued Pension


Be it known, that I, William R. Edwards only son of Rachel Gates, do solemnly swear that I am the born son & heir of Rachel Gates. That the said Rachel Gates died on April 7, 1890. That my P.O. address is Watkins, Meeker County, Minnesota.

Witnesses, Wm M. Abbott, of Watkins, Meeker Co., Minn., and Wm N Cole, of Watkins, Meeker Co., Minn.

Application for Accrued Pension (Widows), State of Minnesota, County of Meeker

November 29, 1890

Wm. R. Edwards son of Rachel Gates, who being duly sworn, declares that he is the lawful and only heir of Rachel Gates, deceased; that she died on April 7, 1890; that she had been granted a pension by Certificate No. 31.132 which is herewith returned; that she had been paid the pension by the Pension Agent at Mill Meeker up to March 4, 1890.

That her name before said marriage was Rachel Edwards; that she had been previously married; that her husband had been previously married; that Wm. R. Edwards her only son he hereby makes application for the pension which had accrued on aforesaid certificate to the date of death.

Witnesses: Wm M. Abbott and W. W. Cole

Department of the Interior, Pension Office, Washington, D.C., January 5, 1891


“I have to advise you that you have no rite to accrued pensions as the only son of the deceased. If you bore the expenses of the last sickness and burial of the decedant you can so inform this Bureau by letter, and furnish evidence to show the fact.”

To Com. Of Pensions, Washington, D.C., Meeker County, Minnesota, January 12, 1891

W. R. Edwards being duly sworn, says that Rachel Gates – Widow of Ardel Gates a Pensioner of the War of 1812, Certificate No. 31132, died at his residence in the town of Forest Prairie, Meeker County, Minnesota. April 7, 1890 – that the deceased at the time of her death left no property real or personal with which to pay Expenses of Burial and that the said W. R. Edwards born the expenses of the last sickness and burial of the said Rachel Gates widow of Ardel Gates – and the said W. R. Edwards respectfully asks the Commissioner of Pensions to reimburse – him for money paid which is as follows:

Coffin $25.00

Shroud $5.00

Preparing the Corpse for burial  $5.00

Funeral Sermon $5.00

Total $38.00

National Society United States Daughters of 1812, Headquarters Office of the President National, Mrs. Samuel Preston Davis, 311 East Capital Avenue, Little Rock, Arkansas, United States Pension Commissioner, Washington, D. C.

“Can you give me proof of pension of Ardel (Ardil) Gates who served in the War of 1812 as a private, in the New York State Militia? He was born in Vermont. Have the information that Ardel Gates received a pension of $96 a year. I want this information for joining the U. S. Daughters of 1812.” Miss Mae Ferguson, President for Iowa, N.S.U.S.D. 1812, State Center, Iowa; U. S. Pension Office July 6, 1925

Rev. and 1812 War Section, September 15, 1925, Miss Mae Ferguson, State Center, Iowa.

In 1887, she was living with Mr. Edwards, her Son-in-law, name of his wife not given.

(Response to the above letter requesting information for a society application. All previous documented information is included in this letter responding to the request for information on Ardel Gates. The above sentence is inaccurate, as she was living with her son and the name of his wife was provided as Rachel Gates. U.S. Census information confirms her name.)

Final Thoughts


Information about Ardil Gate’s company being taken as prisoners of war is confirmed in several publications. It appears that the record keeping at the time of the event was limited, and what is known today came from Canadian records and personal accounts. Ardil does not list any additional service after his release. He was kept as a prisoner of war for about two months. During this time the prisoners were kept in a fairly civil manner. No health issues were mentioned that would keep him from further service. At the time of the release, soldiers were required to sign a contract or parole, swearing that they would not bear arms against the British after being released. It would seem that he probably returned home to Hinesburg to help his mother who was a widow, his father having passed away in 1793. His brothers continued to serve after he was released. It would have been interesting to hear Ardil’s personal account of this experience. Here are two small excerpts from published books:

“The first Battle of the Salmon River ["French Mills" (near to Fort Covington, NY, USA) as the Americans refer to it (also near to St. Regis, Lower Canada)] was fought very briefly under a night sky and in poor weather on November 22nd, 1812 and Canadian occupation carried over to the early hours of the next day, November 23rd, 1812.

Fort Covington initially became occupied by the Americans in July of 1812 when they proceeded to begin the construction of a blockhouse on Covington Hill. It was from Fort Covington that Major Guilford Young (Troy Militia), aided by Capt. Rufus Tilden (Moira Militia) and Lt. Noble (Essex Militia), twice made raids on St. Regis in Lower Canada the second being successful in that the Americans plundered Canadian provisions and captured a company of British soldiers in the process. The distance between the two locations was/is approximately 18 miles. The American junior officers involved in the second raid on St. Regis expressed concern that Major Young was attempting to lead them against a British/Canadian force at Montreal and so they withdrew their men quickly to French Mills on the Salmon River. It was here that the Americans, numbering 50, were attacked by the Canadians.

Lt. Col. Alex McMillan (Glengarry Militia) commanded and led a direct and spirited assault against the Americans using sound judgment. His second in command, Lt. Col. Neil McLean (Stormont Militia) was in command of the embarkation. In less than an hour the enemy that had fled to a blockhouse for protection had surrendered because they were outnumbered and completely surrounded. The Canadians had captured 4 river boats (bateaux), 57 muskets, 47 soldiers, 2 lieutenants and 1 captain.

The Canadians and their Indian allies retired back to Cornwall in Upper Canada where the Glengarry Militia was assigned with delivering the American prisoners to Coteau du Lac. Once there they were taken by boat to Montreal where they were eventually paroled and exchanged for some York Militiamen who had been captured during the summer months of 1812.”13

The Canadian perspective has a slightly one-sided view to the event. The next reference is from an American perspective.

“The prisoners were sent to Montreal, and about two weeks later were exchanged for the British soldiers who had been taken at St. Regis. Captain Tilden was reproached for his surrender without having made any defense at all, and in some quarters was charged with cowardice because of it. Whether his course was even an error in judgment is to be doubted. The enemy outnumbered him three to one or more, his only defense was a roofless blockhouse”14

The information provided by Ardil Gates is validated by the above references. We can appreciate the judgment of Captain Tilden, as it may well have preserved the life of our ancestor. Franklin J. Seaver notes that, “the records of the early activities in this locality are very incomplete and somewhat confusing.”15 By using personal accounts and a variety of sources he was able to compile a thorough review of the incident. This event in the War of 1812 was an embarrassment to the U.S. government and therefore became a forgotten event in a forgotten war.



Addendum

On Wednesday, January 18, 2012, I received the War of 1812 records for the three Gates brothers, before referred prior to endnote #10 in this article. The records include the following information:

Gates, David: Rank Private, Organization Capt. David Erwin, Co. of Col. Albon, Man; 40 Brig., 66 Regiment, Paid from Nov. 29, 1812 to Dec. 8, 1812, $2.22, Remarks paid by S. Edmonds P.M., Voucher #7,”C”. In service at French Mills, N.Y. Roll 44.

Gates, David: Rank Private, Organization Capt. Seth Hickok, Co. of Col. Thos. Smith; 42 Brig., __ Regiment, Paid from Sept. 11, 1814 to Sept. 20, 1814, $2.66, Remarks E. M. Laughlin, Voucher 16. Roll 1965.

Gates, David: Rank Private, Organization Capt. Um Covil, Co. of Col. Pliny Adams, __ Regiment, Paid from Sept. 11, 1814 to Sept. 22, 1814, $3.20, Remarks In service at Dec.?, At Burlington Sep. 18th 1814, distance from residence 75 miles. E. McLaughlin, Vou #474. Roll #1972. (This may be another person.)

Gates, David: Rank Private, Organization Capt. Peleg Mattison, Co. of ___, __ Regiment, Paid from Oct 8th 1814 to ___, $__, Remarks, Deserted, S. Edmonds P.M. Vou. 48L

From Oneida County. Roll 124.

Gates, Richard: Rank Priv., Organization Capt. David Erwin, Co. of __, __ Regiment, Cavalry, Paid from Aug. 15, 1813 to Nov 15, 1813, $26.65, Remarks E. M. Laughlin P.M. Vouc. Cavalry used as Express and Completely Equipped. Roll 1829.

Gates, Ardil, there were no pay vouchers for him. Note from his documents follow.

No. 12672 & 12673, Claim of Ardil Gates, L. Jenkins, Attorney, Clothing and Equipments $75.00, Contingent Expenses $9.50, Total $84.50, A.U. Muzzy, agent.

State of Pennsylvania, County of Erie, “I Benjamin Grant Commissioned for New York… Do hereby Certify, That the Militia service of Ardil Gates…as appears from Affidavit attached…I also Certify, That the said Ardil Gates though not personally known to me, has been proven to my satisfaction to be the person above described…In testimony whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name, this fifth day of August 1858. Benjamin Grant, A Commissioner for the State of New York.”

Declaration, United States of America – State of Pennsylvania, County of Erie, fifth August 1858, “personally appeared before me. Coms. For New York, within and for the County and State aforesaid, Ardil Gates aged fifty six years, a resident of Labocuff, Erie County, in the State of Pennsylvania who being duly sworn according to law, declares that he is the identical said Ardil Gates who was a private in the Company commanded by Rufus Tilden in the Regiment of New York Militia commanded by Maj. Young, in the war with Great Britain, declared by the United States on the 18th day of June 1812. That he volunteered under the general orders of the Governor of this State, for its defense at Malone, New York on or about the 8th of July 1812, for the term of six months and continued in actual service in said war, for the term of over six months and was honorably discharged from said service on or about the twelfth day of January 1813 at Malone, New York, for which he has received from the United States two land warrants No. not collected, for 80 acres each….”

See insert of partial copy of original document, with his signature.

He was paid $75 for Clothing and Equipment and $9 for discharge expenses and $.50 for expenses at Montreal while a prisoner of for food.

Letter from his son Richard Gates age forty-one years, of Erie County, Pennsylvania, August 5, 1858, attesting to the United States land warrant for eighty acres for service in the War with Great Britain, that he saw the warrant in June 1856 while living in Laboeuff, Erie County, Pennsylvania, but he was not able to read the numbers on it.

It would seem that Ardil may have lost the bounty land warrants he received in 1855, prior to submitting a request for reimbursement, filed in 1858, for expenses during his term of service, return travel to his home and food while in prison. He was awarded $84.50 for this reimbursement. Earlier in the article I mentioned the importance of locating the claim indexed in a database at ancestry.com wherein he received $73 under claim #12673. It would appear that this is that claim.

Thus, we experience many serendipity moments, as we continue the research of Ardil Gates, the soldier and POW of the War of 1812, and his brothers David and Richard.

For additional serendipity moments and other family history stories, see Susan’s blog at: http://gophergenealogy.blogspot.com



1 Minnesota Will Records, 1849-1985 for Ardil Gates, 1880, Meeker County, Minnesota, Will Books, Volume A 1864-1883, Pages: 154-156, Digital Folder Number:004412115, familysearch.org, accessed April 2011. The County Clerk was unaware that this index was available online and said it was somewhat useful in finding the record.
2 Jonathan Webb Deiss, a private records accessor for files from the National Archives. The files he sends by email contain full color copies. It truly is exceptional service. His website is: www.citizenarchivist.net.
United States, War of 1812 Index to Pension Application Files, 1812-1910 for Ardel Gates, Spouse Rachel Longstreet, NARA Publication. Title:Index to War of 1812 Pension Application Files, NARA Publication Number: M313, NARA Roll Number: 35, Film Number: 840465, Digital Folder Number: 4019808, Image Number: 00737,
3 United States, War of 1812 Index to Pension Application Files https://familysearch.org/search/records/index, accessed April 2011.
4 War of 1812 Service Records for Ardell Gates, Vermont Militia, Roll Box: 79, Roll Exct: 602. War of 1812 Service Records, Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. Original data: National Archives and Records Administration. Index to the Compiled Military Service Records for the Volunteer Soldiers Who Served During the War of 1812. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M602, 234 rolls. Accessed 1 January 2012.
5 United States, War of 1812 Index to Pension Application Files https://familysearch.org/search/records/index, accessed April 2011.
6 United States, War of 1812 Index to Pension Application Files, 1812-1910 for David Gates NARA Publication Title:               Index to War of 1812 Pension Application Files, Publication Number: M313, Roll Number: 35, Film Number: 840465, Digital Folder Number: 4019808, Image Number:00741. https://familysearch.org/search/records/index, accessed January 1, 2012.
War of 1812 Service Records for David Gates, New York Militia, Direct Data Capture, .War of 1812 Service Records,. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. Original data: National Archives and Records Administration. Index to the Compiled Military Service Records for the Volunteer Soldiers Who Served During the War of 1812. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M602, 234 rolls. Accessed 1 January 2012.
7 War of 1812 Service Records for Richard Gates, New York Militia, Direct Data Capture, .War of 1812 Service Records,. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. Original data: National Archives and Records Administration. Index to the Compiled Military Service Records for the Volunteer Soldiers Who Served During the War of 1812. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M602, 234 rolls. Accessed 1 January 2012.
8 US Gen website listing, War of 1812 Veterans Living in Franklin County, New York, http://www.usgwarchives.org/ny/franklin/military/1812/service/1812vetsres.htm, accessed January 1, 2012.
9 The Official War of 1812 Bicentennial Website, Celebrating 200 Years of Peace, Timeline, http://www.visit1812.com/history/, accessed December 20, 2011.
10 New York State Archives War Service Records Search Request, New York State Archives Cultural Education Center Room 11A36 Albany, NY 12230.  Accessed December 20, 2011. http://www.archives.nysed.gov/a/research/res_topics_mi_warsvc_form.shtml
Will search War of 1812 Abstracts of Payrolls for N.Y. State Militia (B0810) and Certificates of Claims (A0020, A3352). The certificates are indexed in Index of Awards on Claims of the Soldiers of the War of 1812 (Albany: 1860; repr. 1969). (A veteran's claim stated war service in order to obtain reimbursement for clothing, arms, and equipment furnished at the soldier's expense.)
11 Ancestry.com. New York Military Equipment Claims, War of 1812, Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. Original data: New York Adjutant General's Office. Index of Awards on Claims of the Soldiers of the War of 1812. Albany, NY, USA: n.p., 1860. Accessed January 1, 2012.
12 The Glengary Light Infantry Fencibles, The Battle of French Mills, November 22, 1812, Mr. Jesse Pudwell; August 2009, http://glengarrylightinfantry.ca/battle_french_mills.php, accessed January 2, 2012.
US Genweb archives Franklin County, New York War of 1812 Service, Records for Ardel Gates and Rufus Tilden in which the contains same information that his company was captured at French's Mills (Ft. Covington) in 1812 and sent to Montreal as prisoners. 
Frederick J. Seaver, History of Fort Covington, New York From: Historical Sketches Of Franklin County and Its Several Towns, Published by J. B. Lyon Company, Albany, NY 1918, Library of Congress copyright free, http://history.rays-place.com/ny/ft-covington-1-ny.htm
13 The Glengary Light Infantry Fencibles.
14 Historical Sketches Of Franklin County and Its Several Towns. Pg. 594.
15Ibid.. Pg. 590.

No comments:

Post a Comment